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Hello students. We are now in Halloween, a holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. When we think of Halloween, we think about pumpkins, witches, vampires and other scary things.

But, have you heard of the Day of the Dead?

During several days, Mexico celebrates a tradicional holiday which traces its origins to hundreds of years ago when native americans ( the Aztecs ) dedicated a festival to Mitecacihuatl, the underworld goddess.

After the Spanish colonization, many elements merged with the traditional culture, and nowadays this is one of the most important, familiar and colourful celebrations in Mexico. With this, death becomes a party instead of something creepy or sad. Families make symbolic offerings (including the favourite drink and food) to spirits of those members of the family who died and come every year to visit their loved ones.

A candle lit grave, Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebrations in a cemetery in Tzintzuntzan, Lago de Patzcuaro, Michoacan state, Mexico, North America

A candle lit grave, Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebrations in a cemetery in Tzintzuntzan, Lago de Patzcuaro, Michoacan state, Mexico, North America

Besides this, sense of humor is an essential element. People use to write down poems or songs laughing at death.

In 2008 this tradition was included in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

You can watch a video of the latest parade in Mexico City

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWwT-r2uBv4